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(Future of Biotech) OF INTERCOURSE AND INTRACOURSE Sex-Biomodification

Rated 5.00 out of 5 based on 1 customer rating
(1 customer review)

$29.99

From cavemen using flint stones in caves to businessmen and smart phones in downtown high-rises, our world is already way more bizarre than our ancestors could have ever imagined. Don’t you think, replicants? But it may not be bizarre enough to subvert the heterosexist matrix that is underlying our world. This book presents some pressing reasons to hack and overcome within the next century.

Featuring essays and projects by Eleanor Saitta, R.U. Sirius, Jack Sargeant, Annalee Newitz, Katrien Jacobs, Christian Heller, Bonni Rambatan, Kyle Machulis, Saul Albert, Tatiana Bazzichelli, Johannes Grenzfurthner, Violet Blue, Carol Queen, Douglas Spink, Rose White, Rainer Prohaska, Thomas Ballhausen, Uncle Abdul, Elle Mehrmand (Echolalia Azalee), Micha Cárdenas (Azdel Slade), Ani Niow, Monika Kribusz, Noah Weinstein, Randy Sarafan, Allen Stein, Kim De Vries, Pepper Mint, Robert Glashuettner and Jonathon Keats.

 

Product Description

We may sometimes forget that mankind is a sexual and tool-using species, and that we use tools in sex, and sex as tools. And that’s why monochrom’s conference Arse Elektronika deals with sex, technology and the future. As bio-hacking, sexually enhanced bodies, genetic utopias and a plethora of genders have long been the focus of literature, science fiction and, increasingly, pornography, this anthology sees us explore the possibilities that fictional and authentic bodies have to offer. Genesis Breyer P-Orridge is not the ONLY one exploring this territory!

 

Additional Information

Weight 1.93 lbs

1 review for (Future of Biotech) OF INTERCOURSE AND INTRACOURSE Sex-Biomodification

  1. Rated 5 out of 5

    A review appearing in NEURAL magazine, Issue 40:

    This is the third anthology after “Do Androids Sleep with Electric Sheep?” and Pr0nnovation?: Pornography and Technological Innovation” to expand on and “archive” an edition of the Arse Elektronika festival. The event, which takes place each year in San Francisco, was, initiated and fostered as a conference by Johannes Grenzfurthner. The founder’s legacy is very clear in the heterogeneous selection of texts and projects included here, reflecting his remarkable work with the “monochrom” fanzine. In fact, the book includes and amazing number of stimulating and often disturbing ideas related to fringe world of sex and technology, which deeply questions what the editors refer to as the “heterosexist matrix” (in this sense it also fits well into RE/Search back catalogue). Concepts are expressed via academic papers, interviews, panels transcriptions, underground science fiction, artwork documentation, and instructions on how to build electronic Do-It-Yourself sex toys (for example the “Steampunk Vibrator”, the “Joydick” and the “Pussypad”). The book opens windows onto a series of rare yet serious contexts that make the reader feel temporarily dislocated; uncertain about when the scenarios described may actualize. The hybrid nature of this work doesn’t make it a bizarre object, but rather a useful compendium for exploring what bodies and desires mean in a stretched contemporaneity, with no room for prejudices and with many new possible paths to take.”

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“How will people react, the first time they see a person with a tentacle for an arm walking down the street? How will they react the first time they end up in bed?” (19).

“You say that the sex machine should be in a museum. I think it is a great starting point so everybody can go there and fuck the machine; or it would be even better if in the future the sex machine will be at any street corner!” (70).

“A society in which it is so easy to change sex will rapidly find out if it is treating one gender better than the other; within the population, over time, there will gradually be greater and greater numbers of the sex it is more rewarding to be, and so pressure for change — within society rather than the individuals — will presumably therefore build up until some form of sexual equality and hence numerical parity is established” (128).

“Play Atari with yourself and friends in the manner that you always dreamed of and never have to decide between sexual stimulation and video games again” (149).

“My journey continued into the wonderful world of sex technology in high school. I discovered the bass trombone and the tuba. Most other high school band players, especially the trumpets, were extending their range higher and higher. I did the opposite … went low. I filled in the bottom with my deeper rumble and was very amused that my genitals would tingle on some lower notes. The lower I went the better it felt. I particularly noticed it with the low ‘D’ below just the staff. Wow! I was playing a giant musical vibrator! This feels good” (152).